Butterfly Chintz Carnations and Shells
Chestertown
                                  Vine
Chestertown Vine Everard Damask
Everard Medallion Ipswich Sprig
Norton
                                  Conyers Diamond Pagodas
Norton Conyers Diamond Pagodas
Sayward
                                  Gothic Strawberry
                                  Hill Floret
Sayward Gothic Strawberry Hill Floret
Strawberry
                                  Hill Plaid Strawberry
                                  Hill Quatrefoil
Strawberry Hill Plaid Strawberry Hill Quatrefoil
Walpole
                                  Damask Webb
                                  House Damask
Walpole Damask Webb House Damask
West St.
                                  Marys
West St. Mary's
Everard
                                  Damask
Click image for larger view View alternate colorways: B  C   D  


English circa 1760

This wallpaper is reproduced from fragments found on the walls of the dining room at the Thomas Everard House in the historic town of Colonial Williamsburg, Virginia. It is an excellent example of the large scale floral and foliate imitations of damask textiles that were popular in the mid 1700s.

"Flocking" was often used to imitate fabric in wallpaper patterns and was one of the earliest styles of wallpaper. However, the production of flocked papers involved a laborious and expensive process of using varnish to adhere dyed and chopped wool to the paper. A less expensive technique was employed to print the original document of this pattern: by printing a deep color on top of a lighter shade of the same hue, the pattern mimics the effect of flocking. These types of papers were often referred to as "mock flocks."

This pattern is licensed to Adelphi Paper Hangings by The Colonial Williamsburg Foundation.

Repeat 19 inches
Width 21 inches
Straight Match

The historic colorway image above shows two widths of the pattern installed.  Alternate colorway images show one complete width of the pattern.